Current Data on Entering the Workforce Without Critical Skills Valued by Employers

The good news:  yes, the U.S. economy is stronger and continues to add new jobs [in very strategic sectors] at a steady rate each month.  The bad news: stories continue to appear which highlight the dis-connect between employers and students as to whether or not they (students) enter the job market with the type of […]
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Inequalities in Global Labor Market-Where Will College-Educated Talent Come From?

Originally posted on Global Career Compass:
Interesting report from McKinsey Global Institute is cited in this Economist essay: http://www.economist.com/node/21556974. Despite great efforts to improve schools and universities, workers in the emerging world are less educated than those elsewhere. Some 35% in China and a stunning 70% in India have no more than a primary education. Yet…

Access, Innovation, Equality & Social Mobility

I just attended a conference on the theme, “Bridging the growing divide in [U.S.] higher education.”  Topics included, education for upward mobility and what isn’t working; educating for democracy & global competitiveness. Readers of this blog know I’ve been writing on this theme from differing angles over the past three years. Speakers pointed to a new […]
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Graduating “Employable” Students

I’ve just completed a new book chapter with Dr. Cheryl Matherly from the University of Tulsa, titled “Higher Education and the Employability Agenda.” It will come out in a textbook sometime this year (Palgrave) on Higher Education Policy and Governance.  We spent many months conducting quite a bit of background research on this topic and […]
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Musings & Comments About Value of International Education and Coping With Uncertainty

Originally posted on Global Career Compass:
Over the years, I’ve regularly commented about what others have written online in essays or blog posts… here are a few selected statements which reflect my point of view: “…there are very few campuses in the country [the U.S.] whose study abroad or career service offices are equipped to…

2014 in review– Thanks for connecting! Happy new year to my readers!

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog. Here’s an excerpt: A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 4,900 times in 2014. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 4 trips to carry that many people. Click here to […]
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2014 Conference Presentations, Blogs & Workshops on Education Abroad & Student Career Development

2014 was a busy year for Global Career Compass!  I was able to address issues on a variety of themes to diverse audiences: NAFSA Annual Conference (http://www.nafsa.org/Attend_Events/): “Linking Education Abroad & Student Career Development: Effective Advising Practices” “21st century Skills & the Workplace: Challenges for Education Abroad Professionals” NAFSA Blogpost (http://blog.nafsa.org/2014/05/08/strengthening-the-campus-study-abroad-advising-process/):  “Strengthening the Study Abroad […]
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Resources for Campus Internationalization

Originally posted on Global Career Compass:
While I have found no causal connection  between campuses with strong internationalization policies and robust practices when it comes to linking study abroad & career service offices to advise students on their study abroad decision-making, this portal provides an important compendium of resource links for review: http://campusinternationalization.org/ On the other…

Is College the Wrong Place to Prepare for Work?

Originally posted on Global Career Compass:
I’m thinking about this question as the Chronicle of Higher Education writes about a piece reviewed in the NY Times:   http://chronicle.com/blogs/next/2013/02/21/are-career-oriented-majors-a-waste-of-a-4-year-higher-education/?cid=at&utm_source=at&utm_medium=en One-third of  new programs [created at four year institutions] in the last decade were added in just two broad fields: health professions (where credential inflation is rampant)…

That Includes Me

Originally posted on iEARN-USA:
The real value of study abroad isn’t that it can transform individual lives, it’s that study abroad can transform all of our lives. Study abroad transforms lives by increasing awareness and empathy. Successful programs, like the Kennedy-Lugar Youth Exchange and Study (YES) Program, begin this transformation during the pre-departure orientations. YES…

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