China to Evaluate College Majors by Employability Rates

In this post to the Wall Street Journal – http://blogs.wsj.com/chinarealtime/2011/11/23/china-to-cancel-college-majors-that-dont-pay – we learn that China’s solution to the nagging issue of growing unemployment of college grads is simple: assess which majors do best in realizing employment for grads.  Keep those and cancel the rest!  China’s numbers of university-educated jumped to 8,930 per 100,000 in 2010, up nearly 150% from 2000, according to their 2010 census.  This surge, “has contributed to an overflow of workers whose skill sets don’t match with the needs of the []

“Cultural distance” Presents Problem in Finding Talent for MNCs in China

This interesting post from Wharton – http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article.cfm?articleid=2903 – highlights the gap between the expansion of multinationals in China and the capacity of China’s education system (and ours) to prepare young professionals to meet the challenges of working in the country.  The good news is the growth in the number of Chinese students abroad – about 200,000 in 2010 – along with a 30% increase over 2009 in the number studying in the U.S.  The article cites the development of innovative new inter-university linkages as []

How global workforce development leverages opportunities for U.S.grads & Indian start-ups

Great to welcome in 2012 with an article in the Washington Post which speaks very directly to the inter-connections of  global workforce development with U.S. higher education!  See this piece at http://www.washingtonpost.com/rw/WashingtonPost/Content/Epaper/2012-01-01/Gx4.pdf.  Here we see the new draw of high-tech start-ups in India for U.S. grads willing to risk re-location coupled with the way in which U.S.-educated Indian professionals can utilize their ties to their alumni institution ( in this case the University of Pennsylvania) to secure the talent they need to grow []

Outcomes of Studying Abroad: What You See is What You Get

From the Chronicle of Higher Ed, researcher Mark Salisbury (12-16-11) is reported to find that there may be “other” [albeit none are discussed…) means to more cost effectively build student cross-cultural skills and intercultural competence than to study abroad. Really?  Most international educators I know understand that not all modes of overseas study are designed to equally impact “domains” of student intercultural competencies. As I’ve written, campuses must design their international programs with desired learning outcomes in mind; you cannot simply provide []

Navigating the Job Search After Study Abroad…

http://www.studyabroad.com/articles/navigating-the-job-search-after-study-abroad.aspx: …In the current tough economic climate, there’s intense competition for jobs in every field.  The question is how well prepared are you to compete and what can you do to stand out among your peers when the time comes to conduct a job search in your senior year?  Of course, internships and service-learningin the U.S. or abroad offer unique opportunities to build important skills and competencies, but studying abroad has many unique benefits which you can leverage.  If you carefully assess and analyze the []

The Purposeful Connection of an Internship to Student Career Development

These are my notes from my webinar presentation conducted by the Sub-Committee on Work, Internships and Volunteering Abroad of NAFSA, Nov. 15, 2011 “Integrating the Internship Experience Into Long-Term Career Development” A NEW RATIONALE FOR EDUCATION ABROAD — Given the impact of globalization in the workplace, and in light of the new skills in demand by businesses, nonprofits and government, it’s to a student’s advantage to consider the career implications of what may be a once-in-a –lifetime educational experience.  Today’s global marketplace []

How International Education Impacts a Global Career

Do Employers Value Education Abroad Experience? At first glance, the answer seems quite self-evident. How could they not? In a domestic economy which grows more linked to overseas markets and investors each year, companies must be on the cutting edge of new technological developments; always looking for opportunities in emerging markets in the developing world; constantly assessing their workforce requirements to insure that managers and workers understand the inter-related economic forces which impact their performance and the firms’ bottom line. Globalization is []


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I came across Martin Tillman’s work regarding the impact of education abroad on career development while conducting my own research toward my doctoral dissertation. I quickly realized that his grounded and highly practical insights and advice would be extremely helpful in my own work as a career counselor at the University of Pennsylvania where I [previously] advised students who are considering or recently returned from study abroad. Upon their return, study abroad participants are almost always quick to say the experience changed them for the better, but they often have difficulty articulating how the knowledge and skills they developed while abroad could prove beneficial in their career development.

I regularly refer students to his “AIFS Student Guide to Study Abroad & Career Development,” which is referenced on [the Penn] website, because it is a comprehensive and accessible resource for helping students recognize the connections between their experiences abroad and their career development while offering specific tips for marketing their experience to prospective employers.

Kelly Cleary

Dean of Career and Professional Advising, Haverford College

As I read and collected research based and practical literature I came to appreciate and consult the work of a select group of knowledge producers and thought leaders in the field and Marty Tillman remains on this list….

Marty’s Global Career Compass blog is one of the most valuable and thought-provoking resources I subscribe to in the field today and one that should top the list of education abroad professionals across the globe. In addition to his writings, Marty is also an engaging speaker and presenter and I work to arrange my schedule at conferences so that I can attend his sessions.

David Comp, Associate Director, International Programs, University of Chicago Booth School of Business

 

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