IHEC Blog will be reporting from IIE Generation Study Abroad Summit in Washington DC, Oct. 23-25, 2016

Originally posted on International Higher Education Consulting:
I’ll be attending theupcoming IIE Generation Study Abroad Summit as a member of the media (for IHEC Blog) and not as being from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. I’ll be blogging, tweeting and posting to Facebook before, during and after the Summit!  I’m hoping to secure some great interviews with key people associated with Generation Study Abroad as well as other prominent stakeholders in the field.  I also plan to try out…

Campus Education Abroad ‘Sherpas’

I’ve just read a very important article by Goldie Blumenstyk in the August 16 Chronicle of Higher Education (via subscription only), “Meet Higher Education’s Newest Players: ‘Education Sherpas.’  It’s applying the analogy of the sherpa as guide to the acute need on our campuses for mentors to assist students make it through the “higher ed maze.” Especially for low-income and first gen students.  In case you did not know the stat, less than 50% of students who start college finish their degree []

Are we beyond “it was great”?

I’m pleased to share this guest post by Jessica Miller, on a topic which has often been discussed here. The difference is that Jessica is , as she says, a young grad and new to the international education field.  Her comments are instructive for students starting on campus this Fall or who are preparing for their first study abroad program- or who are graduating in 2017. And the answer to her question is:  not yet. ____________________________________________ As a recent graduate, a recent []

New Book: International Higher Education’s Scholar-Practitioners: Bridging Research and Practice

Originally posted on International Higher Education Consulting:
Edited by BERNHARD STREITWIESER & ANTHONY C. OGDEN The idea of the professional who bridges both research and practice has been largely overlooked and at times even disregarded by the academic and administrative structures that govern activity in higher education today. In international higher education, the number of students who now engage in mobility and exchange has expanded globally, along with the administrative cadre that manages all facets of internationalization, and the quickly growing scholarly…

A Students’ Place in the World

In the cycle of life, it’s that time once again. Students are graduating from colleges and universities across the country and for many, the unanswered question is: Now what? Shortly, NAFSA: Association of International Educators will conduct its annual international conference in Denver. And one of its major speakers is NY Times columnist, David Brooks. In thinking about graduation and what “place” lies ahead for millions of youths, I re-read his September 8, 2014 Times column, “Becoming a Real Person.” Brooks references []

The Seven Cardinal Virtues of Study Abroad

Originally posted on NAFSA: Association of International Educators Blog:
Study abroad is a transformative experience of learning and growth for students. Although less than 1% of the U.S. student community participates in study abroad, we know that when a college student elects to take advantage of such a priceless opportunity, the borders that exist between peoples, whether defined or abstract, stop obstructing interaction. Students who challenge themselves to make a deeper connection with our rapidly changing world are more adaptable, accomplished contributors…

How Study Abroad Supports Graduate Employability

Originally posted on Global Career Compass:
The full essay appears in the AIFS study abroad advisor newsletter, International Perspectives: http://www.aifsabroad.com/pdf/perspectives_2015.pdf We’ve recently witnessed a spate of new books authored by policy wonks which aim to re-examine the mission of the university in the United States and whether we need to “unbundle” how we educate students. Their titles are provocative, like The End of College, and they consider rising tuition and debt which burden large numbers of students and their families. Although we’ve left…


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I came across Martin Tillman’s work regarding the impact of education abroad on career development while conducting my own research toward my doctoral dissertation. I quickly realized that his grounded and highly practical insights and advice would be extremely helpful in my own work as a career counselor at the University of Pennsylvania where I [previously] advised students who are considering or recently returned from study abroad. Upon their return, study abroad participants are almost always quick to say the experience changed them for the better, but they often have difficulty articulating how the knowledge and skills they developed while abroad could prove beneficial in their career development.

I regularly refer students to his “AIFS Student Guide to Study Abroad & Career Development,” which is referenced on [the Penn] website, because it is a comprehensive and accessible resource for helping students recognize the connections between their experiences abroad and their career development while offering specific tips for marketing their experience to prospective employers.

Kelly Cleary

Dean of Career and Professional Advising, Haverford College

As I read and collected research based and practical literature I came to appreciate and consult the work of a select group of knowledge producers and thought leaders in the field and Marty Tillman remains on this list….

Marty’s Global Career Compass blog is one of the most valuable and thought-provoking resources I subscribe to in the field today and one that should top the list of education abroad professionals across the globe. In addition to his writings, Marty is also an engaging speaker and presenter and I work to arrange my schedule at conferences so that I can attend his sessions.

David Comp, Associate Director, International Programs, University of Chicago Booth School of Business

 

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