Making the most of opportunities

Originally posted on Omolabake Fakunle:
Might sound like a cliche, but I believe that good preparation precedes taking meaningful advantage of opportunities. And opportunities sometimes lurk at unexpected corners. My main point in this post is linked to recent experiences as a research student – an aspect of my life that I am always delighted to discuss – though that had not been the topic of most of my posts here on my personal blog. Just over a month ago, I wrote…

Elon University’s Purposeful Plan to Link Education Abroad & Student Career Development

I’m pleased to share this guest post by Kristen Aquilino, International Career Fellow in the Elon Student Professional Development Center.   Elon is one of the many campuses I cite in my publication for AIFS: “Campus Best Practices Supporting Education Abroad & Student Career Development (2014):  http://www.aifsabroad.com/advisors/pdf/Tillman_AIFS_Campus_Best_Practices.pdf _________________ Elon University’s Strategic Plan highlights eight main priorities, each with ambitious key objectives.  The first priority is “an unprecedented university commitment to diversity and global engagement.” This commitment calls for a holistic approach, and there are []

Connecting the Dots: How Study Abroad Impacts Employability

Originally posted on NAFSA: Association of International Educators Blog:
By Marty Tillman An American expat running a study abroad program in the Gulf region recently commented on LinkedIn that when students were asked: “What were your expectations before the trip?,” their responses generally were: “I thought it was going to be a vacation,” or “I thought there was going to be more down time.” The perception that study abroad falls solely within the tourism or leisure travel sector is present in some…

On the Mission of the University

Originally posted on Global Career Compass:
When I attended grad school in the late 60s, the student protest movement against the Vietnam War largely pushed those of us interested in working in higher education administration to [re]examine the mission or purpose of the university.  The draft meant that you HAD to think about why you were in college since it was literally a lottery as to whether or not you could graduate and start a career or see what was out there…

Closing the Expectation Gap Between Students & Employers

Originally posted on Global Career Compass:
On the NAFSA: Association of International Educators blog page, I wrote:  http://blog.nafsa.org/2015/04/24/closing-the-expectation-gap-between-students-employers/ Overview of results from a January 2015 survey by the Association of American Colleges & Universities pointing to need for all campuses to creatively innovate and create a campus culture fully integrating career development with curricular offerings and with co-curricular opportunities – like study abroad and international internships. 

What is the purpose of a “higher”education in the 21st century?

A UK perspective, https://www.timeshighereducation.com/blog/its-time-rethink-what-social-mobility-means, by Graeme Atherton: head of AccessHE and director of the National Education Opportunities Network. His new book, The Success Paradox: why we need a holistic theory of social mobility, is published by Polity Press. He writes: “Concentrating solely on economic progression is pushing social mobility into a corner, and may be doing as much harm as good. Social mobility is in essence about what you think success is. The big issues that are coming to dominate the early []

Intelligence is NOT Enough

Originally posted on Global Career Compass:
I’m going to try to pull together my thoughts this day following on the horrific attacks in Paris. I’ve been an international educator for over 40 years. I’ve had to make sense of 60s student protests, the Vietnam War, the assasinations of two Kennedy brothers, of M.L King, of  the murders of Israeli athletes in Munich, of two intifadas, of apartheid, of 9-11, of the deaths in Iraq & Afghanistan, of a sniper randomly killing citizens in…

Why Don’t Students Understand The Linkage Between Study Abroad & Employability?

The short answer is–I don’t know and I’m not sure there are easy ways to expain why. Last week, along with my colleague, Dr. Vera Chapman, Associate Director of Career Services at Colgate University, we conducted a webinar for NACE (National Association of Colleges and Employers) with participants from a diverse group working in career service offices at 71 colleges and universities (public, private, small, large, urban amd rural and in all regions of the country). When asked if their students understood []

The Art of Being Human & “Value” of a College Education

Originally posted on Global Career Compass:
This essay is a time-out for me.  I’ve been speaking about the need for students to become more savvy about how to link their international education experiences to their aspirations for employment for a long time.  Titles in this blog reflect that quite clearly. And I know that many of my colleagues are very concerned about the need for their campuses to do a better job about preparing their students to enter the workforce. In the…

Higher Education and the Employability Agenda – A Global Perspective

Originally posted on Global Career Compass:
Dr. Cheryl Matherly and I have co-authored a chapter (Part Two, Chapter 16) on this topic in the just released Palgrave International Handbook of Higher Education Policy and Governance.  You can review the book’s contents and see all contributors at – http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/The-Palgrave-International-Handbook-of-Higher-Education-Policy-and-Governance/?sf1=barcode&st1=9781137456168  This link only provides you a look at the diversity of contributors and the table of contents. It is expensive, unfortunately; but I’d be glad to try to reply to specific questions. We examine the…


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I came across Martin Tillman’s work regarding the impact of education abroad on career development while conducting my own research toward my doctoral dissertation. I quickly realized that his grounded and highly practical insights and advice would be extremely helpful in my own work as a career counselor at the University of Pennsylvania where I [previously] advised students who are considering or recently returned from study abroad. Upon their return, study abroad participants are almost always quick to say the experience changed them for the better, but they often have difficulty articulating how the knowledge and skills they developed while abroad could prove beneficial in their career development.

I regularly refer students to his “AIFS Student Guide to Study Abroad & Career Development,” which is referenced on [the Penn] website, because it is a comprehensive and accessible resource for helping students recognize the connections between their experiences abroad and their career development while offering specific tips for marketing their experience to prospective employers.

Kelly Cleary

Dean of Career and Professional Advising, Haverford College

As I read and collected research based and practical literature I came to appreciate and consult the work of a select group of knowledge producers and thought leaders in the field and Marty Tillman remains on this list….

Marty’s Global Career Compass blog is one of the most valuable and thought-provoking resources I subscribe to in the field today and one that should top the list of education abroad professionals across the globe. In addition to his writings, Marty is also an engaging speaker and presenter and I work to arrange my schedule at conferences so that I can attend his sessions.

David Comp, Associate Director, International Programs, University of Chicago Booth School of Business

 

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