Closing the Expectation Gap Between Students and Employers

Originally posted on NAFSA: Association of International Educators Blog:
By Marty Tillman Even though we finally have good economic news for the Class of 2015, this remains a confusing topic to write about. There is clear evidence of the financial gains for students with BA degrees versus those without the credential, and yet there is also incontrovertible research showing that employers (largely surveyed in the private sector) believe that students are graduating without the skill sets that they need to be hired…

How Study Abroad Supports Graduate Employability

We’ve recently witnessed a spate of new books authored by policy wonks which aim to re-examine the mission of the university in the United States and whether we need to “unbundle” how we educate students. Their titles are provocative, like The End of College, and they consider rising tuition and debt which burden large numbers of students and their families. Although we’ve left the worst of the recession behind us –especially with a sharp rebound in the unemployment figures which always favor job seekers with college diplomas – there is a lot of attention being given to new thinking regarding the linkage of higher education to the global workforce and the so-called “return on investment” of a college education….

On Increasing the Number & Diversity of Students Going Abroad in Future Generations

I’m sure you’re well aware of the ambitious initiative of IIE to support academic institutions in the United States with the goal of doubling the national number of students – from the current 300K to 600K – who study abroad by 2019.  The Institute is sponsoring a “summit” in Fall, 2015 to serve as a catalyst for those institutions who sign up as “partners” – http://www.iie.org/en/Programs/Generation-Study-Abroad/About; to date, there are about 600 partners who have committed to set their own goals towards realizing []

‘American Universities Are Addicted to Chinese Students’

Originally posted on An International Educator in Viet Nam:
A startling number of Chinese students are getting kicked out of American colleges. According to a white paper published by WholeRen, a Pittsburgh-based consultancy, an estimated 8,000 students from China were expelled from universities and colleges across the United States in 2013-4. The vast majority of these students—around 80 percent—were removed due to cheating or failing their classes. As long as universities have existed, students have found a way to get expelled from…

Separate And Unequal Access to Higher Education & Impact on Equal Access to International Education

Originally posted on Global Career Compass:
This report in the Chronicle of Higher Education http://chronicle.com/blogs/conversation/2013/08/01/how-to-fight-growing-economic-and-racial-segregation-in-higher-ed/?cid=at&utm_source=at&utm_medium=en is very troubling to me. During the recession,  I’ve had increasing concerns about  the longstanding issue of unequal access to international educational experiences on campuses.  We used to refer to this as a need to focus on “under-represented” populations but this often was a bit vague:  men are in this category, but, most of the time we were really talking about race and not gender equality. And now…

Macroeconomics, Inequality & Study Abroad

Originally posted on Global Career Compass:
How do these come together?  I’ve been thinking about this due to the surprising popularity of a new book by Thomas Pinketty called “Capital in the Twenty-first Century.”  While I have not read it, I’ve heard him speak about it and read reviews —bottom line, we are a nation of growing economic inequality and it’s not going away. It’s a structural problem.  We also know about the increasing concern about massive student debt – upwards of…

WHAT DOES RESEARCH HAVE TO DO WITH BUILDING CAREERS IN INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION?

Michael is a longtime colleague whose views on the role and function of research not only make sense but seem compelling to me – MJT Guest blog By Michael Smithee President, SmitheeAssociates Website:  http://smitheeassociates.com/   Research rather than opinion Twenty years ago, advancing knowledge in the field of international education was in a nascent stage.  There were very few journals and books that spoke to issues embedded in the field of  international education.  Internationalization was a term that often drew quizzical looks from []

Nepal Earthquake: How Can I Help?

Originally posted on accountabilitylab:
This blog post was originally published by The Center for High Impact Philanthropy. On Saturday, April 25, a 7.8 magnitude earthquake hit Nepal, with additional tremors continuing throughout the last three days. Nearly 5,000 are already confirmed dead, with many thousands more injured and/or without adequate food, water, or shelter.  At times like this, the first question for many is, “How can I help?” For those who want to help, here’s what you need to know now. There are…

The World Needs More International Higher Education – University World News

Appearing in the April 24, 2015 Global Edition of University World News, this essay offers a solid framework and rationale for all campuses around the world.  Perhaps a bit overly optimistic when the author states “no country…is immune from the process of globalization…” I can think of many. Yet, I do like the reference to the “virtuous cycle” of internationalization and globalization. I have not read the book, Democratizing Higher Education, where research “shows that international higher education has been an important []

Closing the Expectation Gap Between Students & Employers

On the NAFSA: Association of International Educators blog page, I wrote:  http://blog.nafsa.org/2015/04/24/closing-the-expectation-gap-between-students-employers/ Overview of results from a January 2015 survey by the Association of American Colleges & Universities pointing to need for all campuses to creatively innovate and create a campus culture fully integrating career development with curricular offerings and with co-curricular opportunities – like study abroad and international internships. 


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I came across Martin Tillman’s work regarding the impact of education abroad on career development while conducting my own research toward my doctoral dissertation. I quickly realized that his grounded and highly practical insights and advice would be extremely helpful in my own work as a career counselor at the University of Pennsylvania where I [previously] advised students who are considering or recently returned from study abroad. Upon their return, study abroad participants are almost always quick to say the experience changed them for the better, but they often have difficulty articulating how the knowledge and skills they developed while abroad could prove beneficial in their career development.

I regularly refer students to his “AIFS Student Guide to Study Abroad & Career Development,” which is referenced on [the Penn] website, because it is a comprehensive and accessible resource for helping students recognize the connections between their experiences abroad and their career development while offering specific tips for marketing their experience to prospective employers.

Kelly Cleary

Dean of Career and Professional Advising, Haverford College

As I read and collected research based and practical literature I came to appreciate and consult the work of a select group of knowledge producers and thought leaders in the field and Marty Tillman remains on this list….

Marty’s Global Career Compass blog is one of the most valuable and thought-provoking resources I subscribe to in the field today and one that should top the list of education abroad professionals across the globe. In addition to his writings, Marty is also an engaging speaker and presenter and I work to arrange my schedule at conferences so that I can attend his sessions.

David Comp, Associate Director, International Programs, University of Chicago Booth School of Business

 

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