Nepal Earthquake: How Can I Help?

Originally posted on accountabilitylab:
This blog post was originally published by The Center for High Impact Philanthropy. On Saturday, April 25, a 7.8 magnitude earthquake hit Nepal, with additional tremors continuing throughout the last three days. Nearly 5,000 are already confirmed dead, with many thousands more injured and/or without adequate food, water, or shelter.  At times like this, the first question for many is, “How can I help?” For those who want to help, here’s what you need to know now. There are…

The World Needs More International Higher Education – University World News

Appearing in the April 24, 2015 Global Edition of University World News, this essay offers a solid framework and rationale for all campuses around the world.  Perhaps a bit overly optimistic when the author states “no country…is immune from the process of globalization…” I can think of many. Yet, I do like the reference to the “virtuous cycle” of internationalization and globalization. I have not read the book, Democratizing Higher Education, where research “shows that international higher education has been an important []

Closing the Expectation Gap Between Students & Employers

On the NAFSA: Association of International Educators blog page, I wrote:  http://blog.nafsa.org/2015/04/24/closing-the-expectation-gap-between-students-employers/ Overview of results from a January 2015 survey by the Association of American Colleges & Universities pointing to need for all campuses to creatively innovate and create a campus culture fully integrating career development with curricular offerings and with co-curricular opportunities – like study abroad and international internships. 

A Global Kumbaya Moment: “We’ve Got the Whole World at University…Is It Worth It?

Leave it to those UK editors at The Economist!  The special report in the March 28 issue: http://www.economist.com/news/special-report/21646985-american-model-higher-education-spreading-it-good-producing-excellence is an excellent overview , on a global scale, of the impact of massification of the higher education industry. While crediting the U.S. and our research university system for launching the globalization of higher ed, they ask the $64,000 question: is it – or has it been – worth the investment of resources?  Yes, the “return” on this investment is relatively greater in poorer nations, but, []

Graduating “Employable” Students

Originally posted on Global Career Compass:
I’ve just completed a new book chapter with Dr. Cheryl Matherly from the University of Tulsa, titled “Higher Education and the Employability Agenda.” It will come out in a textbook sometime this year (Palgrave) on Higher Education Policy and Governance.  We spent many months conducting quite a bit of background research on this topic and looked at material from both North America, Europe, Asia and Africa. If you’re interested at all in reading about youth unemployment…

Lifetime Employment “vs.” Lifetime Employability

Originally posted on Global Career Compass:
I’ve been a longtime user of LinkedIn and consulted on its effective use as a tool in the job search process.  The site is universally – across national borders – seen as an indispensable tool for any professional (whether employed or job seeking).  And so this article reporting an interview with the site’s founder, Reid Hoffman, was intriguing:  http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB20001424052702304168904580031461652986300. Hoffman has a way with metaphors and I liked his statement that [private sector] employers, to remain…

The Art of Being Human & “Value” of a College Education

This essay is a time-out for me.  I’ve been speaking about the need for students to become more savvy about how to link their international education experiences to their aspirations for employment for a long time.  Titles in this blog reflect that quite clearly. And I know that many of my colleagues are very concerned about the need for their campuses to do a better job about preparing their students to enter the workforce. In the times we’re in, this is, needless []

Black Students Studying Abroad & “The Next Great Migration”

This may be the most controversial title & theme I’ve ever written about. But it is not my idea, rather, it is the title of an op-ed in the Sunday New York Times of March 1, 2015, by Thomas Chatterton Williams:  http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/01/opinion/sunday/the-next-great-migration.html?_r=0 Williams is an African-American ex-pat who writes from Paris.  The gist of his essay has to do with his outrage over “the extrajudicial police killings of black men and women across America.”  And he asks why  more black Americans are not []

Current Data on Entering the Workforce Without Critical Skills Valued by Employers

The good news:  yes, the U.S. economy is stronger and continues to add new jobs [in very strategic sectors] at a steady rate each month.  The bad news: stories continue to appear which highlight the dis-connect between employers and students as to whether or not they (students) enter the job market with the type of skill sets they need to be hired (and this mis-match of expectations is wider in specific technical fields such as STEM). For example, see Jeff Selingos’ recent piece []

Inequalities in Global Labor Market-Where Will College-Educated Talent Come From?

Originally posted on Global Career Compass:
Interesting report from McKinsey Global Institute is cited in this Economist essay: http://www.economist.com/node/21556974. Despite great efforts to improve schools and universities, workers in the emerging world are less educated than those elsewhere. Some 35% in China and a stunning 70% in India have no more than a primary education. Yet this will change: China and India, McKinsey predicts, will be the world’s main source for skilled workers over the next two decades. The two countries alone will…


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I came across Martin Tillman’s work regarding the impact of education abroad on career development while conducting my own research toward my doctoral dissertation. I quickly realized that his grounded and highly practical insights and advice would be extremely helpful in my own work as a career counselor at the University of Pennsylvania where I [previously] advised students who are considering or recently returned from study abroad. Upon their return, study abroad participants are almost always quick to say the experience changed them for the better, but they often have difficulty articulating how the knowledge and skills they developed while abroad could prove beneficial in their career development.

I regularly refer students to his “AIFS Student Guide to Study Abroad & Career Development,” which is referenced on [the Penn] website, because it is a comprehensive and accessible resource for helping students recognize the connections between their experiences abroad and their career development while offering specific tips for marketing their experience to prospective employers.

Kelly Cleary

Dean of Career and Professional Advising, Haverford College

As I read and collected research based and practical literature I came to appreciate and consult the work of a select group of knowledge producers and thought leaders in the field and Marty Tillman remains on this list….

Marty’s Global Career Compass blog is one of the most valuable and thought-provoking resources I subscribe to in the field today and one that should top the list of education abroad professionals across the globe. In addition to his writings, Marty is also an engaging speaker and presenter and I work to arrange my schedule at conferences so that I can attend his sessions.

David Comp, Associate Director, International Programs, University of Chicago Booth School of Business

 

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